Capitalism, Workers, Men and Women, Freedom

Capitalism signs the breakdown of order.
Workers signalize the discontent of the masses.
Men and women mission to be deaf to
the inevitable end. Freedom will
triumph.

“Capitalism is rushing blindly to its impending doom. All the signs portend the inevitable breakdown of the existing order. Deep-seated discontent has seized upon the masses. They must indeed be deaf who do not hear the mutterings of the approaching storm.

Poverty, high prices, unemployment, child slavery, widespread misery and haggard want in a land bursting with abundance; prostitution and insanity, suicide and crime, these in solemn numbers tell the tragic story of capitalism’s saturnalia of blood and tears and shame as its end draws near.

It is to abolish this monstrous system and the misery and crime which flow from it in a direful and threatening stream that the Socialist party was organized and now makes its appeal to the intelligence and conscience of the people. Social reorganization is the imperative demand of this world-wide revolutionary movement.

The Socialist party’s mission is not only to destroy capitalist despotism but to establish industrial and social democracy. To this end the workers are steadily organizing and fitting themselves for the day when they shall take control of the people’s industries and when the right to work shall be as inviolate as the right to breathe the breath of life.

Standing as it does for the emancipation of the working class from wage-slavery, for the equal rights and opportunities of all men and all women, for the abolition of child labor and the conservation of all childhood, for social self-rule and the equal freedom of all, the Socialist party is the party of progress, the party of the future, and its triumph will signalize the birth of a new civilization and the dawn of a happier day for all humanity.”

[source ]

The Man

Vague points,
Obscure policies,
Pro hair!

[Look in the mirror,
Weisenheimer.]

You make vague points
about obscure policies
rescuing the economy
and why the current regime
will destroy, if allowed
to, sacred principles,
as well as innocent lives,
but I can’t get past
the waves of your hair,
clearly sculpted by a pro
who must travel with you, with
a little leather kit of clippers
and scissors and gel, who
is synced into iPhones
for twenty-minute sessions
each morning, and longer yet
for trims, alternating weeks.
He eats well and sees
the country through glass
and blasts of hot air
rising from tarmacs.
Though the speech has changed,
weekly, the hair is an anchor
hearts are moored to through
the eyes of the people.
Satisfaction comes in work
well done, no matter the end—
at least up to the end.
Cf. Oppenheimer. Look,
I’m certain you pay him well
and mean the praise you speak
before the mirror he holds up
to your resplendent head.

[source ]

Some Methods of Governance

Measure critics to prove conflict.
Favor Congress, not history.
Vote against speech.
Recount time by declarations of war.
Call in grievances to form law.
Represent.

“On 1 June 1812, President James Madison gave a speech to the U.S. Congress, recounting American grievances against Great Britain, though not specifically calling for a declaration of war. After Madison’s speech, the House of Representatives quickly voted (79 to 49) to declare war, and the Senate by 19 to 13. The conflict formally began on 18 June 1812 when Madison signed the measure into law. This was the first time that the United States had declared war on another nation, and the Congressional vote would prove to be the closest vote to declare war in American history. None of the 39 Federalists in Congress voted in favor of the war; critics of war subsequently referred to it as “Mr. Madison’s War.” ”

[source ]

To the Man Speaking

You make vague points
about obscure policies
rescuing the economy
and why the current regime
will destroy, if allowed
to, sacred principles,
as well as innocent lives,
but I can’t get past
the waves of your hair,
clearly sculpted by a pro
who must travel with you, with
a little leather kit of clippers
and scissors and gel, who
is synced into iPhones
for twenty-minute sessions
each morning, and longer yet
for trims, alternating weeks.
He eats well and sees
the country through glass
and blasts of hot air
rising from tarmacs.
Though the speech has changed,
weekly, the hair is an anchor
hearts are moored to through
the eyes of the people.
Satisfaction comes in work
well done, no matter the end—
at least up to the end.
Cf. Oppenheimer. Look,
I’m certain you pay him well
and mean the praise you speak
before the mirror he holds up
to your resplendent head.
[Evan Vucci/AP]

 

Do you ever think about losing?

The moonlight
The Nevada desert
The end of a winding, darkly lit road

The evening
The evening’s gathering
The absurd, entertaining ritual
The patio bar, the pool
The opportunity to get close

The traveling, the wild ride
The yellowing fairways and burned out
                    greens of
The abandoned golf course
The skies darkening
The impression of relaxing

The stage
The hour
The issues
The fundamental dynamics of
The race
The Benghazi tragedy
The terrifying news
The atomic sized shock waves
The most powerful office in the world

The prize
The anxiety
The fear of being a one-term president
The fear of being
The whole, sleepless, frantic high-stakes
                    experience
The media

A half dozen reporters and three senior Obama officials sat last Monday night around a fire pit on a patio overlooking Lake Las Vegas, which glowed a toxic green under the moonlight. It was late night in the Nevada desert, around 10 p.m., two days before President Barack Obama’s first public debate in four years.

On the invitation of the campaign, the journalists had made the trek from downtown Vegas to the four-star Westin Resort & Spa, about twenty five miles east of the city. It was the spot where the President was holing up for three days, preparing for his showdown with Mitt Romney. The resort — built in 1999 on a man-made body of water and renovated this year for $4 million, with aspirations for a Moroccan vibe (think Rick’s Café) — rested at the end of a winding, darkly lit, road David Lynch would have appreciated.

The concept behind the evening’s gathering was simple: to trade questions and answers before the big night on Wednesday in a more casual, less confrontational setting than a press gaggle. Here at the patio bar, conversations could be had over sips of wine or a dirty Martini or two. For campaign officials, it was a chance to talk just a bit more candidly, with a bit less spin. For journalists, it was the opportunity to get close to what had become one the most tightly held secrets of the campaign: what was really going on in Obama’s debate training camp.

[continued at source ]

Drama

After four years in the White House,
Compelled to defend against attacks
On him as traitor to reform, Taft agreed
To run for a second term.

Former friends became bitter opponents.

Bitter that Taft targeted
One of his “Good Trusts,” and certain
Taft would take the party down,
Roosevelt was determined.

“After four years in the White House, Taft agreed to run for a second term, principally because he felt compelled to defend himself against Roosevelt’s attacks on him as a traitor to reform. The former friends and allies had become bitter opponents. Roosevelt saw Taft as betraying his promise to advance Roosevelt’s agenda. He was especially bitter over Taft’s antitrust policy, which had targeted one of Roosevelt’s personally sanctioned “Good Trusts,” U.S. Steel. The former President also felt personally betrayed by Taft’s firing of Gifford Pinchot, head of the U.S. forest service and Roosevelt’s old friend and conservation policy ally. Certain that Taft would take the party down with him in 1912, Roosevelt was determined to replace him as the 1912 Republican candidate.”

[source ]